WEDNESDAY 10th DECEMBER, 2014 – INTERPRETATIVE LIFE CLASS: STUDENTS’ ARTWORK

JONATHAN ELLIS – FIGURING IT OUT

NO 8 OF 9 ALL-DAY LIFE CLASSES IN THE LONDON SKETCH CLUB IN DILKE STREET

JONATHAN ELLIS – FIGURING IT OUT

THIS INTERPRETATIVE DAY INVOLVED A MORNING WORKING DIRECTLY FROM IAN, THE MODEL, USING DRAWING AS OUR MEANS OF INVESTIGATION. THE AFTERNOON’S PAINTING EXERCISES WERE TRANSPOSED FROM THE MORNING’S STUDIES RATHER THAN FROM THE MODEL, ALLOWING A CREATIVE APPROACH TO DEVELOP. WE USED Frank AUERBACH’s work as a guide.

Arshile Gorky:

Drawing is the basis of art. A bad painter cannot draw. But one

who draws well can always paint ….

Auerbach:

The energy of the execution may first strike the viewer, but it is

energy in pursuit of a geometry of an exact expression

Norman Rosenthal:

“the overriding aim of art has been the making of marks on a surface to achieve a sense of reality.”

“… models are depicted with a near-desperate intensity that creates a deliberate awkwardness between analysis and expression”

 

Herbert Read:

‘The real subject of a picture or a drawing is the plastic facts it succeeds in expressing; and all the world of pathos, of poetry, of sentiment that it succeeds in conveying, is conveyed by the means of the plastic facts expressed, by

  • the suggestions of the three dimensions of space
  • the suggestion of weight
  • the prelude or refrain of movement
  • the promise of movement to come
  • the echo of movement past

 

Catherine Lampert:

Auerbach’s simple and sincere ambition is to juxtapose areas of colour so that they cohere.

A further ambition is that scaffolding or accents in the picture might fall away.

He defines a prismatic, painted unity as the grandest kind of painting.

 

For him, paint’s virtue is its infinite ‘workability’.

We had found our code and, informed by slides of Auerbach’s work, we made

  1. A quick drawing from life in black (charcoal) and white (paper) ensued, using the thick charcoal in a stabbing motion, then
  2. oil pastels and black charcoal, after Auerbach’s studies of Tintoretto’s Portrait of Vincenzo Morosini, in the National Gallery:
  3. a more sustained charcoal drawing, remembering to sustain energy until the end, inventing marks and redrawing over and over again  – please click here for a calming video, only 1:28 long
  4. Painting exercise, from Drawing 1: black & white paint – gestural strokes
  5. Painting exercise, from Drawing 2: simple colour choices, then black oil paint – strokes following flow 
  6. Painting exercise, from Drawing 3: colour and white, without black paint – coherent colour

artworks by artist:

To begin in the middle, at the heart of the day’s drawing, enjoy these slideshows of the sustained drawings as they developed ….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

a smattering of drawings:

 

paintings by artist:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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